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Adequacy of Control of Hypertension in an Academic Nursing Home

Published:September 18, 2007DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2007.06.012

      Objective

      To determine the prevalence of hypertension, of adequate control of hypertension, of number of antihypertensive drugs used to treat hypertension, and of types of antihypertensive drugs used to treat hypertension in older persons who were not terminally ill in an academic nursing home.

      Design

      Hypertension was diagnosed if the systolic blood pressure was 140 mm Hg or higher and 130 mm Hg or higher if the person had diabetes or chronic renal insufficiency or if the diastolic blood pressure was 90 mm Hg or higher and 80 mm Hg or higher if the person had diabetes or chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertension was adequately controlled if the blood pressure was lower than 140/90 mm Hg and lower than 130/80 mm Hg if the person had diabetes or chronic renal insufficiency.

      Setting

      An academic nursing home.

      Participants

      Two hundred and two persons (104 women and 98 men), mean age 73 years (range 50 to 98 years) residing in an academic nursing home.

      Measurements

      Prevalence of hypertension, of adequate control of hypertension, of number of antihypertensive drugs used, and of types of antihypertensive drugs used.

      Results

      Hypertension was present in 143 (71%) of 202 persons. Adequate hypertension control was present in 121 (85%) of 143 persons with hypertension. Of 143 persons treated with antihypertensive drugs, 39 (27%) received 1 antihypertensive drug, 61 (43%) received 2 antihypertensive drugs, 31 (22%) received 3 antihypertensive drugs, 8 (6%) received 4 antihypertensive drugs, and 4 (3%) received 5 antihypertensive drugs. Of 143 persons treated with antihypertensive drugs, 107 (75%) received beta blockers, 88 (62%) received angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, 49 (34%) received diuretics, 41 (29%) received calcium channel blockers, 15 (10%) received clonidine, and 6 (4%) received hydralazine.

      Conclusion

      The prevalence of hypertension in older persons in an academic nursing home was 71%, and 85% of these persons had adequate control of hypertension.

      Keywords

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