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COVID-19 in Italy: Ageism and Decision Making in a Pandemic

  • Matteo Cesari
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Matteo Cesari, MD, PhD, Geriatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Via Pace 9, 20122 Milan, Italy.
    Affiliations
    Geriatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy

    Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
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  • Marco Proietti
    Affiliations
    Geriatric Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy

    Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy

    Liverpool Centre for Cardiovascular Science, University of Liverpool, and Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom
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      The World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 situation as a pandemic on March 11, 2020.
      WHO Director-General’s opening remarks at the media briefing on COVID-19—11 March 2020.
      To date, Italy is the country after China that has been most severely hit by this humanitarian and public health tsunami. Projections are even suggesting that the number of deaths due to SARS-CoV-2 in Italy will continue to increase in the near future, leaving us the sad world record of casualties.
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      References

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