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Increasing Anticholinergic Burden is Associated With Social Vulnerability in the Oldest Old

Published:September 27, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2021.08.039
      Anticholinergic agents are frequently administered to older people with dementia, who are more likely to receive multiple drugs, including psychotropic agents, thus increasing their anticholinergic burden (AB).
      • Hukins D.
      • Macleod U.
      • Boland J.
      Identifying potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people with dementia: A systematic review.
      The unfavorable cognitive, behavioral, and affective side effects of AB accelerate the trajectory to frailty.
      • Moulis F.
      • Moulis G.
      • Balardy L.
      • et al.
      Exposure to atropinic drugs and frailty status.
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