Advertisement

Care for Hearing Loss and Best Principles of Dementia Care: The Time is Right for Inclusion

  • Danielle S. Powell
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Roger C. Liptiz Center for Integrated Health Care, Johns Hopkins University, Hopkins Economics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Services Center, Baltimore, MD
    Search for articles by this author
  • Nicholas S. Reed
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Baltimore, MD
    Search for articles by this author
  • Jennifer L. Wolff
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Roger C. Liptiz Center for Integrated Health Care, Johns Hopkins University, Hopkins Economics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Services Center, Baltimore, MD
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 05, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2022.10.003
      To the Editor:Once considered a benign aspect of aging, recent evidence suggests hearing loss is the largest modifiable risk factor for incident dementia.
      • Livingston G.
      • Huntley J.
      • Sommerlad A.
      • et al.
      Dementia prevention, intervention, and care: 2020 report of the Lancet Commission.
      As many as 6 in 10 older adults with Alzheimer’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease–related dementias (AD/ADRD) have hearing loss,
      • Hubbard H.I.
      • Mamo S.K.
      • Hopper T.
      Dementia and hearing loss: interrelationships and treatment considerations.
      an underdiagnosed, progressive condition that limits communication and engagement with surroundings. There is no cure to return “normal” hearing. Instead, intervention involves providing amplification devices (eg, hearing aids) that manipulate and boost certain sounds in tandem with environmental modifications and communication strategies to help the brain “fill in” missed auditory information. Because the auditory system remains damaged, a large focus of best-practice auditory rehabilitation is guiding patients in acclimating to using augmented sounds to hear what they have been missing.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Livingston G.
        • Huntley J.
        • Sommerlad A.
        • et al.
        Dementia prevention, intervention, and care: 2020 report of the Lancet Commission.
        Lancet. 2020; 6736: 413-446
        • Hubbard H.I.
        • Mamo S.K.
        • Hopper T.
        Dementia and hearing loss: interrelationships and treatment considerations.
        Semin Speech Lang. 2018; 39: 197-210
        • Mamo S.K.
        • Oh E.S.
        • Price C.
        • Reed N.S.
        • Occhipinti D.
        • Lin F.R.
        Hearing loss treatment in older adults with mild cognitive impairment or dementia: a systematic review.
        J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2018; 61: 2589-2603
        • Kathleen Pichora-Fuller M.
        • Singh G.
        Effects of age on auditory and cognitive processing: implications for hearing aid fitting and audiologic rehabilitation.
        Trends Amplif. 2006; 10: 29-59
      1. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers. 2021https://doi.org/10.17226/26026
        • Myers C.
        • Reed N.S.
        • Lin F.R.
        • Willink A.
        A broad examination of health policy barriers to access and affordability of hearing treatment for medicare beneficiaries.
        Semin Hear. 2022; 43: 13-19
        • Feltner C.
        • Wallace I.F.
        • Kistler C.E.
        • Coker-Schwimmer M.
        • Jonas D.E.
        Screening for hearing loss in older adults: updated evidence report and systematic review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.
        JAMA. 2021; 325: 1202-1215
      2. Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017, S 670 (2017-2018), 115th Congress.

        • Colburn J.L.
        • Nothelle S.
        The Medicare annual wellness visit.
        Clin Geriatr Med. 2018; 34: 1-10
        • Lind K.E.
        • Hildreth K.
        • Lindrooth R.
        • Morrato E.
        • Crane L.A.
        • Perraillon M.C.
        The effect of direct cognitive assessment in the Medicare annual wellness visit on dementia diagnosis rates.
        Health Serv Res. 2021; 56: 193-203